Opinion analysis: Limited judicial review of consular officer visa decisions – foreshadowing the result in the same-sex marriage case?

Today, a splintered Supreme Court issued a ruling in Kerry v. Din.  The case raised the question of the continuing vitality of the doctrine of consular non-reviewability and its prohibition of judicial review of visa denials by Department of State consular officers. The doctrine is a close cousin of immigration law’s extraordinary “plenary power doctrine,” which emerged in the late 1800s to uphold laws restricting immigration from China and, in its modern incarnation, immunizes the U.S. immigration laws from ordinary constitutional review.
Over the years, the courts have recognized exceptions to consular absolutism. The most well-known modern example is Kleindienst v. Mandel (1972). In that case, the Supreme Court reviewed a claim brought by U.S. citizens that the exclusion of a Marxist journalist from the United States violated their First Amendment right to hear him speak. In reviewing

Original SCOTUS article

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